latames
Factor investing challenges: limiting turnover

Factor investing challenges: limiting turnover

05-05-2017 | Retos del Factor investing

Factor-based allocation has become increasingly popular in recent years. But how to implement it in practice still remains a puzzle for many newcomers. One concern often voiced by investors is avoiding excessive portfolio rotation.

Speed read

  • Factor strategies imply higher turnover than classic passive investing
  • Turnover can be reduced without hampering gross returns too much
  • Reducing turnover does not mean minimizing it

One oft-heard criticism of explicit allocation to factors is that it inevitably leads to high, or even excessive, portfolio turnover. Indeed, while following a cap-weighted market index can essentially be seen as a ‘buy-and-hold’ approach, with limited portfolio activity, explicit allocation to factors necessarily leads to more dynamic trading.

In cap-weighted indices, stock weights fluctuate naturally with the prices of constituent securities, and changes in the portfolio composition are only triggered by large changes in free-float capitalizations or corporate actions such as mergers, splits or new listings or delistings.

On the contrary, factor-based investment strategies generate turnover from the periodic rebalancing required to maintain optimal exposure to the targeted premiums, for example value, momentum, low volatility or quality. This necessary turnover has led many academics and investors to question whether factor-based solutions are really worthwhile, given the higher trading costs associated with these strategies.

For example, a recent study(1) by Research Affiliates warned about the significant slippage between the factor returns realized by mutual fund managers and the theoretical factor returns that would have been achieved by virtual portfolios, over the 1991–2016 period. The authors attributed this gap to a number of costs related to implementation, including trading costs.

In a 2016 white paper(2), Joop Huij and Georgi Kyosev, of Robeco’s Quant research team, warned specifically about the high rebalancing costs implied by the replication of some common smart beta indices. Analyzing the impact of composition changes for two popular indices, they found that these costs are actually higher than they might appear, as the rebalancing process also leads to lower index returns. This is because strategies that follow publicly available indices, for which changes are announced in advance, tend to buy stocks that have just had a price run-up, and sell stocks that have just suffered a price decrease.

More generally, an FTSE Russell survey carried out in 2016 suggested that avoiding excessive portfolio turnover ranked fourth among investor concerns, when considering factor-oriented allocation.

Manténgase al día de las últimas perspectivas sobre inversión cuantitativa
Manténgase al día de las últimas perspectivas sobre inversión cuantitativa
Suscríbase

Reducing, not minimizing, turnover

But while the risk of excessive turnover should not be overlooked, it should not be exaggerated, either. In fact, it is possible to considerably reduce turnover without hampering performance too much. Robeco’s in-house research shows that when investors start keeping securities with less attractive factor qualities in their portfolios for longer, trading costs tend to decrease faster than the gross return. As a result, the net return/risk ratio tends to increase when turnover starts to decline.

‘Turnover can be reduced without lowering gross returns too much, but only up to a certain point’

This finding does not mean that portfolio changes should be minimized. Turnover can be reduced without lowering gross returns too much, but only up to a certain point. And gross returns also tend to drop rapidly once we allow unattractive securities to remain in the portfolio for too long or rebalance too infrequently. Investors must therefore find the optimal trade-off between factor exposure and rebalancing costs, in order maximize after-cost performance.

Common techniques

There are many ways to reduce and control portfolio turnover, and that can be applied to all kinds of factor-based strategies. The most obvious one is setting and adjusting fixed rebalancing intervals, in order to reassess factor exposures more or less frequently. Another option is allowing a portfolio to deviate more or less from its ideal composition, if only factor exposures were taken into account and implementation costs were neglected. The greater the deviation tolerance, the lower the turnover will tend to be.

In addition to these general techniques, which are widely used by investment managers and index providers, there are also more strategy-specific ways to reduce turnover. Empirical studies carried out on the short-term reversal phenomenon, which has been extensively documented in the academic literature, provide a good illustration of this.

Short-term reversal strategies exploit the fact that stocks that experience huge gains or losses during one month tend to reverse that trend the following month. However, many investors remain skeptical about this kind of approach because they involve huge turnover, as signals typically change completely every month.

But a 2011 paper(3) by Wilma de Groot, Joop Huij and Weili Zhou, of Robeco’s Quant Equity research team, showed that the high transaction costs incurred in many these investment strategies implemented in the US stock market could largely be attributed to excessive trading in small caps. Trading costs could therefore be significantly reduced by limiting the stock universe to large caps. Similarly, comparable ways to reduce turnover can often be found for different kinds of quantitative strategies.

All of Robeco’s quantitative strategies use portfolio-construction processes designed to keep trading low and trading costs under control, using a securities-ranking approach. This kind of method is less sensitive to changing market inputs. Moreover, for credit markets, which lack the immediacy seen in equity markets and where keeping transaction costs under control proves more challenging(4), we have developed a specific investment process, in which liquidity management is actually embedded in the portfolio construction process itself. This enables us to send only those orders which have a high probability of being executed.

Retos del Factor investing
Retos del Factor investing

Esta serie de artículos se propone aclarar algunas de las cuestiones clave a que se enfrentan los inversores cuando adoptan estrategias de factor investing.

Artículos relacionados
Los temas relacionados con este artículo son:
Logo

Información importante

Los Fondos Robeco Capital Growth no han sido inscritos conforme a la Ley de sociedades de inversión de Estados Unidos (United States Investment Company Act) de 1940, en su versión en vigor, ni conforme a la Ley de valores de Estados Unidos (United States Securities Act) de 1933, en su versión en vigor. Ninguna de las acciones puede ser ofrecida o vendida, directa o indirectamente, en los Estados Unidos ni a ninguna Persona estadounidense en el sentido de la Regulation S promulgada en virtud de la Ley de Valores de 1933, en su versión en vigor (en lo sucesivo, la “Ley de Valores”)). Asimismo, Robeco Institutional Asset Management B.V. (Robeco) no presta servicios de asesoramiento de inversión, ni da a entender que puede ofrecer este tipo de servicios, en los Estados Unidos ni a ninguna Persona estadounidense (en el sentido de la Regulation S promulgada en virtud de la Ley de Valores).

Este sitio Web está únicamente destinado a su uso por Personas no estadounidenses fuera de Estados Unidos (en el sentido de la Regulation S promulgada en virtud de la Ley de Valores) que sean inversores profesionales o fiduciarios profesionales que representen a dichos inversores que no sean Personas estadounidenses. Al hacer clic en el botón “Acepto” que se encuentra en el aviso sobre descargo de responsabilidad de nuestro sitio Web y acceder a la información que se encuentra en dicho sitio, incluidos sus subdominios, usted confirma y acepta lo siguiente: (i) que ha leído, comprendido y aceptado el presente aviso legal, (ii) que se ha informado de las restricciones legales aplicables y que, al acceder a la información contenida en este sitio Web, manifiesta que no infringe, ni provocará que Robeco o alguna de sus entidades o emisores vinculados infrinjan, ninguna ley aplicable, por lo que usted está legalmente autorizado a acceder a dicha información, en su propio nombre y en representación de sus clientes de asesoramiento de inversión, en su caso, (iii) que usted comprende y acepta que determinada información contenida en el presente documento se refiere a valores que no han sido inscritos en virtud de la Ley de Valores, y que solo pueden venderse u ofrecerse fuera de Estados Unidos y únicamente por cuenta o en beneficio de Personas no estadounidenses (en el sentido de la Regulation S promulgada en virtud de la Ley de Valores), (iv) que usted es, o actúa como asesor de inversión discrecional en representación de, una Persona no estadounidense (en el sentido de la Regulation S promulgada en virtud de la Ley de Valores) situada fuera de los Estados Unidos y (v) que usted es, o actúa como asesor de inversión discrecional en representación de, un inversión profesional no minorista. El acceso a este sitio Web ha sido limitado, de manera que no constituya intento de venta dirigida (según se define este concepto en la Regulation S promulgada en virtud de la Ley de Valores) en Estados Unidos, y que no pueda entenderse que a través del mismo Robeco dé a entender al público estadounidense en general que ofrece servicios de asesoramiento de inversión. Nada de lo aquí señalado constituye una oferta de venta de valores o la promoción de una oferta de compra de valores en ninguna jurisdicción. Nos reservamos el derecho a denegar acceso a cualquier visitante, incluidos, a título únicamente ilustrativo, aquellos visitantes con direcciones IP ubicadas en Estados Unidos.

Este sitio Web ha sido cuidadosamente elaborado por Robeco. La información de esta publicación proviene de fuentes que son consideradas fiables. Robeco no es responsable de la exactitud o de la exhaustividad de los hechos, opiniones, expectativas y resultados referidos en la misma. Aunque en la elaboración de este sitio Web se ha extremado la precaución, no aceptamos responsabilidad alguna por los daños de ningún tipo que se deriven de una información incorrecta o incompleta. El presente sitio Web podrá sufrir cambios sin previo aviso. El valor de las inversiones puede fluctuar. Rendimientos anteriores no son garantía de resultados futuros. Si la divisa en que se expresa el rendimiento pasado difiere de la divisa del país en que usted reside, tenga en cuenta que el rendimiento mostrado podría aumentar o disminuir al convertirlo a su divisa local debido a las fluctuaciones de los tipos de cambio. Para inversores profesionales únicamente. Prohibida su comunicación al público en general.

No estoy de acuerdo