united kingdomen
Inflation fears and a more hawkish Fed spook markets

Inflation fears and a more hawkish Fed spook markets

08-12-2021 | Monthly outlook

Rising inflation that prompted the Fed to suggest faster tapering which may accelerate rate hikes has rattled markets.

  • Peter van der Welle
    Peter
    van der Welle
    Strategist SMAS

Speed read

  • Markets spooked by Powell retiring the ‘inflation is transitory’ view
  • Forecast for faster tapering means first US rate rise expected in May
  • Equities also hurt by new omicron Covid strain bringing back restrictions 

The much-watched US Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose by 6.2% on an annualized basis, its highest level since 1990. Higher energy and food prices were principally blamed, though the index still rose by 4.6% when these factors were stripped out.

This caused the US Federal Reserve to change its view on inflation from a ‘transitory’ phenomenon to something more permanent during a 30 November testimony by Chairman Jerome Powell to the US Congress, catching markets by surprise.

Equities dropped on fears that a much faster unwinding of stimulus programs (tapering) to combat inflation would be followed by the earlier introduction of the first rate rises since they were cut in March 2020 to combat the pandemic. Bond market gains on the new omicron Covid strain were reversed as they started to price in an earlier rise in rates, now seen in May 2022.

Stay informed on our latest insights with monthly mail updates
Stay informed on our latest insights with monthly mail updates
Subscribe

Faster tapering

“Bond markets globally are faced with rising inflationary pressures and the Fed has now moved away from this ‘transitory’ narrative, which opens the window for faster tapering,” says Peter van der Welle, strategist with the Robeco multi-asset team.

“The Fed funds futures curve steepened in reaction with market participants bringing rate hikes forward in time, with the May 2022 FOMC meeting now seen a ‘live’ (rate-setting) meeting.”

“Based on the swaps curve, rate hike expectations seem to be peaking at around the 1.75% level (up from the current 0.25%). This implies a relatively low terminal rate compared to previous hiking cycles, which is having a gravitational pull on the yields of US 10-year Treasury bonds.”    

Sting in the tail

Equities were already reeling from the announcement of the more contagious omicron variant of Covid-19 which prompted flight bans and more containment measures in Europe, particularly hurting travel and hospitality stocks. 

That was still being absorbed when Powell commented that the Fed should “consider wrapping up the taper of our purchases perhaps a few months sooner”, given that “at this point the economy is very strong and inflation pressures are high”. 

“November is typically a fairly good trading month for equity markets, on average adding 1% to year-to-date returns,” says Van der Welle. “Not so this time around, with global equities dropping 1.5% in the month. The sting in the tail was provided by Powell’s Congressional testimony which caught analysts by surprise.”

Good and bad inflation

“This is a hawkish pivot away from the ‘inflation is transitory’ mantra. At this juncture the Fed is accentuating the hawkish overtones as it has grown more uncomfortable with inflation. The level and speed of inflation increases the risk of second-round effects and entrenched inflation.”

“The nature of inflation matters. Current inflation is not predominantly of the ‘good’ type – the non-accelerating type that coincides with an economy that is operating in equilibrium. Instead, the global economy is experiencing bad inflation caused by supply constraints which ultimately could pave the way for ‘ugly’ inflation.”

“Given the ongoing strength in the US labor market, the potential for this kind of ugly inflation that stems from a wage-price spiral is increasing on the back of improved negotiation power of labor versus employers.” 

New twist from omicron

Van der Welle says Powell acknowledged that the Fed had misjudged inflation as demand was artificially supressed by the pandemic while supply-side pressures created non-linear effects that escaped the normal macro models.

“The new omicron Covid strain adds further momentum to Powell’s latest twist,” he says. “The OECD has warned that inflation will only abate once the pandemic is over. A new strain could lengthen the battle against Covid and thereby inflation.”

But it’s not all bad news, following a stellar US third-quarter earnings season that shows companies are still gaining pricing power, which bodes well for equities.

There are also questions over the chronology of tapering and higher rates as much depends on the US participation rate – the number of people active in the labor market – which gives an indication into the true strength of the economy.

Participation vs. policy rates

“We continue to think that the end of tapering does not mean a seamless transition into a rate hike cycle, as the Fed ideally would see a higher participation rate before raising the policy rate,” says Van der Welle. 

“We expect inflation to moderate in 2022 and this provides the Fed with some leeway to assess whether part of the decline in the participation rate is cyclical. Ultimately, it is not so much the policy rate lift-off date that matters for equity markets, but the degree of tightening versus the terminal rate.”

“With the probability of an over-tightening Fed low in the near term, the US economy will be able to absorb the first policy rate hikes and will continue to grow at a healthy pace in 2022.” 

“Meanwhile, flare-ups in infections and the discovery of new Covid variants may trigger temporary risk-off phases that will be beneficial for government bonds.”

Subjects related to this article are:
Logo

Disclaimer

Please read this important information before proceeding further. It contains legal and regulatory notices relevant to the information contained on this website.

The information contained in the Website is NOT FOR RETAIL CLIENTS - The information contained in the Website is solely intended for professional investors, defined as investors which (1) qualify as professional clients within the meaning of the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID), (2) have requested to be treated as professional clients within the meaning of the MiFID or (3) are authorized to receive such information under any other applicable laws. The value of the investments may fluctuate. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investors may not get back the amount originally invested. Neither Robeco Institutional Asset Management B.V. nor any of its affiliates guarantees the performance or the future returns of any investments. If the currency in which the past performance is displayed differs from the currency of the country in which you reside, then you should be aware that due to exchange rate fluctuations the performance shown may increase or decrease if converted into your local currency.

In the UK, Robeco Institutional Asset Management B.V. (“ROBECO”) only markets its funds to institutional clients and professional investors. Private investors seeking information about ROBECO should visit our corporate website www.robeco.com or contact their financial adviser. ROBECO will not be liable for any damages or losses suffered by private investors accessing these areas.

In the UK, ROBECO Funds has marketing approval for the funds listed on this website, all of which are UCITS funds. ROBECO is authorized by the AFM and subject to limited regulation by the Financial Conduct Authority. Details about the extent of our regulation by the Financial Conduct Authority are available from us on request.

Many of the protections provided by the United Kingdom regulatory framework may not apply to investments in ROBECO Funds, including access to the Financial Services Compensation Scheme and the Financial Ombudsman Service. No representation, warranty or undertaking is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information on this website.

If you are not an institutional client or professional investor you should therefore not proceed. By proceeding please note that we will be treating you as a professional client for regulatory purposes and you agree to be bound by our terms and conditions.

If you do not accept these terms and conditions, as well as the terms of use of the website, please do not continue to use or access any pages on this website.

I Disagree