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Eliminating PFAS brings fresh opportunities for water investments

Eliminating PFAS brings fresh opportunities for water investments

03-06-2021 | Insight
  • Jindapa Wanner-Thavornsuk
    Jindapa
    Wanner-Thavornsuk
    Equity Analyst

Speed read

  • Some PFAS banned, others still used in industry and consumers products
  • Research still exploring link to health and environmental impacts
  • Regulation and clean up technologies creating tailwinds for water
PFAS are chemicals that may be in your backyard but also in your living room, kitchen, bathroom and tap water. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (or PFAS for short) are not only everywhere, they also have earned the notorious moniker of “forever chemicals.” They don’t break down naturally and so accumulate in the environment and the human body.

PFAS is not a single chemical but rather a broad class of chemicals (more than 4,700) that are widely used in industrial processes and consumer goods. The two most notorious PFAS (PFOA and PFOS sub-groups) are confirmed to cause serious health issues and pose a risk to public health. For this reason, many countries have banned their production, but efforts are still needed to clean up contamination in water supplies and soils.

Increasing product sophistication means waste is becoming more complex (and dangerous)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) just recently issued a regulatory determination for PFOA and PFOS, an important step in establishing minimum allowable concentration levels in public water supplies. Similar measures are in effect across the EU and in other countries worldwide. But besides PFOA and PFOS, thousands of other PFAS are still produced and used across the global economy. The confirmed risks of just a few has put the entire group under closer scrutiny.

Given tighter regulatory environments and heightened public awareness, the market for treating and remediating PFAS pollutants already in water supplies is expected to swell. In March, the Biden administration announced more than a hundred billion USD in funding to build a resilient water infrastructure that includes decontaminating and monitoring PFAS in US soil and water supplies. Moving forward, investments are expected to expand for test-detection analytics, filtering systems, and safe waste disposal technologies in water and waste management utilities and across industries that use and produce PFAS.

Knowledge of the full impact of all PFAS is still unclear. What is clear is that society and the man-made products it consumes are growing ever more sophisticated. Increasing product sophistication means waste is becoming more complex (and dangerous). In future, the power and precision of basic services like supplying safe water and providing effective waste treatment must also increase to protect public health and natural resources.

Steady growth streams should lift investments across the water value chain in the next decade.

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