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Megatrends shape business and society

Megatrends shape business and society

25-03-2019 | Video

Three powerful megatrends are shaping today’s world – transformative technology, ‘preserving Earth’ and changing sociodemographics. Understanding these trends helps investors benefit from the opportunities they offer. Transformative technologies is one of the key forces shaping business and society. In China, for example, mobile payments are making cash and credit cards obsolete. So we invest in fintech companies that are at the cutting edge of tomorrow’s payment methods.

As concerns about the future of our planet grow, climate change is becoming top of mind for investors. In addition, huge changes in society such as  an aging global population are affecting a whole host of industries, from pension and financial services to health care. At the same time, India and China are seeing a burgeoning middle class, creating plenty of new opportunities for consumer brands.

Our new animation video shows why it is important for investors to identify the right trends, wait for the right momentum and select companies with strong exposure to these megatrends. 

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