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BY CLICKING ON “I AGREE”, I DECLARE I AM A WHOLESALE CLIENT AS DEFINED IN THE CORPORATIONS ACT 2001.

What is a Wholesale Client?
A person or entity is a “wholesale client” if they satisfy the requirements of section 761G of the Corporations Act.
This commonly includes a person or entity:

  • who holds an Australian Financial Services License
  • who has or controls at least $10 million (and may include funds held by an associate or under a trust that the person manages)
  • that is a body regulated by APRA other than a trustee of:
    (i) a superannuation fund;
    (ii) an approved deposit fund;
    (iii) a pooled superannuation trust; or
    (iv) a public sector superannuation scheme.
    within the meaning of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993
  • that is a body registered under the Financial Corporations Act 1974.
  • that is a trustee of:
    (i) a superannuation fund; or
    (ii) an approved deposit fund; or
    (iii) a pooled superannuation trust; or
    (iv) a public sector superannuation scheme
    within the meaning of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993 and the fund, trust or scheme has net assets of at least $10 million.
  • that is a listed entity or a related body corporate of a listed entity
  • that is an exempt public authority
  • that is a body corporate, or an unincorporated body, that:
    (i) carries on a business of investment in financial products, interests in land or other investments; and
    (ii) for those purposes, invests funds received (directly or indirectly) following an offer or invitation to the public, within the meaning of section 82 of the Corporations Act 2001, the terms of which provided for the funds subscribed to be invested for those purposes.
  • that is a foreign entity which, if established or incorporated in Australia, would be covered by one of the preceding paragraphs.
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White paper on the ins and outs of illiquid investments

White paper on the ins and outs of illiquid investments

24-09-2015 | Research

Investing in illiquid asset classes has become increasingly widespread among pension funds in the last few decades. There are a number of reasons for its increasing popularity, including the notions of higher expected returns and the potentially greater diversification opportunities that illiquid investments can offer. However, it is not always clear what the required extra return or diversification advantage of illiquidity should be. Robeco researchers Thijs Markwat and Roderick Molenaar and portfolio strategist Jaap Hoek delved into the basic principles of the assumed liquidity premium to give investors insight into investing in illiquid asset classes.

  • Thijs Markwat
    Thijs
    Markwat
    Portfolio strategist
  • Jaap Hoek
    Jaap
    Hoek
    Portfolio Strategist
  • Roderick  Molenaar
    Roderick
    Molenaar
    Portfolio Strategist
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