Disclaimer

BY CLICKING ON “I AGREE”, I DECLARE I AM A WHOLESALE CLIENT AS DEFINED IN THE CORPORATIONS ACT 2001.

What is a Wholesale Client?
A person or entity is a “wholesale client” if they satisfy the requirements of section 761G of the Corporations Act.
This commonly includes a person or entity:

  • who holds an Australian Financial Services License
  • who has or controls at least $10 million (and may include funds held by an associate or under a trust that the person manages)
  • that is a body regulated by APRA other than a trustee of:
    (i) a superannuation fund;
    (ii) an approved deposit fund;
    (iii) a pooled superannuation trust; or
    (iv) a public sector superannuation scheme.
    within the meaning of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993
  • that is a body registered under the Financial Corporations Act 1974.
  • that is a trustee of:
    (i) a superannuation fund; or
    (ii) an approved deposit fund; or
    (iii) a pooled superannuation trust; or
    (iv) a public sector superannuation scheme
    within the meaning of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993 and the fund, trust or scheme has net assets of at least $10 million.
  • that is a listed entity or a related body corporate of a listed entity
  • that is an exempt public authority
  • that is a body corporate, or an unincorporated body, that:
    (i) carries on a business of investment in financial products, interests in land or other investments; and
    (ii) for those purposes, invests funds received (directly or indirectly) following an offer or invitation to the public, within the meaning of section 82 of the Corporations Act 2001, the terms of which provided for the funds subscribed to be invested for those purposes.
  • that is a foreign entity which, if established or incorporated in Australia, would be covered by one of the preceding paragraphs.
I Disagree
What drives the value premium?

What drives the value premium?

16-10-2014 | Research

The empirical evidence for the presence of a value premium in stock markets is overwhelming. But why does this phenomenon exist? A new white paper examines a popular explanation.

  • David Blitz
    David
    Blitz
    PhD, Executive Director, Head of Quant Selection Research

Speed read:

  • We examine a popular explanation called the overreaction hypothesis
  • This hypothesis is based on the extrapolation of past sales or earnings growth
  • It attributes the value premium to behavioral factors
  • Generic value strategies cannot be enhanced significantly based on this hypothesis
  • We conclude that the evidence supporting it is quite weak

Reasons why value premium exists are debated

Although there is by now a consensus that a strong value premium is present in the data, the reasons why this phenomenon exists are still heavily debated. In previous research we provided strong evidence against the distress risk explanation, showing that although simple value strategies can get a large exposure to distressed stocks, this does not explain the high return of value stocks.

More risk-based explanations have been proposed in the literature, but next to that there is also a school of thought which attributes the value premium to behavioral factors. In this white paper (download below) we examine one such behavioral explanation, namely the overreaction hypothesis.

According to this hypothesis, value stocks do show lower growth rates in subsequent years, and growth stocks do show higher subsequent growth rates, but not nearly as long and to the extent needed to justify the differences in valuation assigned to them by the market.

Stay informed on Quant investing with monthly mail updates
Stay informed on Quant investing with monthly mail updates
Subscribe

Little empirical support for overreaction hypothesis

We find that although overreaction indicators appear to be fairly promising on a stand-alone basis, they are not really effective for enhancing a generic value strategy. Moreover, if we disentangle the contribution to return of various factors, valuation is significant while the overreaction indicators are not.

This indicates that valuation ratios are really driving differences in future stock returns. Based on these findings we conclude that the empirical support for the overreaction hypothesis is quite weak.

Leave your details and download the report.

Subjects related to this article are: