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Our hopes for real action at COP26

COP26: Good COP or bad COP?

  • What to expect from the most important conference on climate change? Will it be a good COP… or a bad COP? During the COP26 conference will produce five video reports, to help you navigate whether the summit is a gamechanger.

  • Watch our very own Kenneth Robertson, Robeco’s man on the ground, as he follows the progress being made towards tackling climate change, and the potential outcomes for the investment and financial industry.

COP26 video series

Five video reports that help you assess whether the COP26 summit in Glasgow was a good COP or a bad COP.

Beefing up net zero commitments

[6 min.] It’s essential for countries to beef up their commitments to becoming carbon neutral by 2050 in order to meet the Paris Agreement. They need to accelerate decarbonization under the ‘ratchet mechanism’ – making progressively bigger cuts in emissions. But it actually needs a 100-fold increase in carbon reductions… so can this be done?
Watch the video

Helping poorer countries to adapt

[10 min.] – Developed countries are historically responsible for most of the emissions, and the challenge is to stop emerging markets going down the same coal-fired path. The Paris Agreement aims to stimulate USD 100 billion in finance flows from rich to poor countries every year to mitigate climate change, but this goal is currently far out of reach.
Watch the video

Using nature to offset emissions

[7 min.] - Over half of all greenhouse gas emissions are absorbed by nature. Forests, land and oceans are our biggest allies in limiting global warming, and are also critical to protecting biodiversity. The restoration of nature can be boosted through funding from carbon credits – and by dealing with the elephant in the room of ending deforestation.
Watch the video

Toughening up on carbon disclosure

[8 min.] – It’s essential to know just how much carbon is being emitted each year by countries and companies, but the current system of disclosure is random and voluntary. This year saw a strong push for the global harmonization of disclosure methods, and for making it mandatory. But it remains haphazard and really needs a firm commitment from COP26.
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The verdict on the COP26 summit

[10 min.] – So, did our leaders rise to the occasion and understand the gravity of the climate crisis we’re in? In order to meet a 2 degree warming scenario, the world needs to cut emissions by 50% by 2030. Currently it’s 0.5%. This 100-fold gap needs to be addressed with serious commitments to a net zero pathway – or it’s all a lot of hot air.
Watch the video
  • Good cop, bad cop? Our hopes for real action at COP26

    The most important conference on climate change is about to take place, six years after the Paris Agreement was signed.
    Read more
  • Robeco commits to net zero carbon ambition by 2050

    Robeco is committing to achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions across all its assets under management by 2050.
    Find out more

Our road to net zero in 2050

Robeco CIO Victor Verberk and Climate Strategist Lucian Peppelenbos outline how Robeco plans to achieve net zero emissions across all its assets under management by 2050.
Watch the webinar replay
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