australieen
Brexit – the options and consequences

Brexit – the options and consequences

07-07-2017 | Insight

The Brexit timeline has begun, and the clock is now ticking, so what are the prospects for the UK? The country now faces two years of potentially tortuous negotiations in order to leave the EU by the deadline of 29 March, 2019.

  • Léon  Cornelissen
    Léon
    Cornelissen
    Chief Economist

On the first anniversary of the historic Brexit referendum, the government minister in charge of delivering it has said it is likely to be more difficult than the moon landing. There are a number of sticking points, from the cost of the divorce, to what to do with millions of expats on either side of the English Channel.

And the biggest issue remains what the UK will do when it leaves a Single Market that it has enjoyed trading with, tariff free, for more than four decades. A number of options are available, including those already followed by non-EU nations, though none look set to be politically or economically expedient. In the meantime, the country faces a greatly weakened currency, rising inflation and falling GDP growth.

In this white paper, we analyze the consequences of Brexit, the likely path that secession will take, and the economic and political consequences for the future of the UK.

Stay informed on our latest insights with monthly mail updates
Stay informed on our latest insights with monthly mail updates
Subscribe

Leave your details and download the report

This report is not available for users from countries where the offering of foreign financial services is not permitted, such as US citizens and residents.
Disclaimer:

I agree to the Robeco Disclaimer and the collection and use of my personal data by Robeco, for the purposes for which such data is collected and used as set out in the Privacy Policy, including for the purpose of direct marketing of Robeco products or services. Your data will be treated with utmost care and will not be passed on to third parties.

Subjects related to this article are:

Disclaimer

BY CLICKING ON “I AGREE”, I DECLARE I AM A WHOLESALE CLIENT AS DEFINED IN THE CORPORATIONS ACT 2001.

What is a Wholesale Client?
A person or entity is a “wholesale client” if they satisfy the requirements of section 761G of the Corporations Act.
This commonly includes a person or entity:

  • who holds an Australian Financial Services License
  • who has or controls at least $10 million (and may include funds held by an associate or under a trust that the person manages)
  • that is a body regulated by APRA other than a trustee of:
    (i) a superannuation fund;
    (ii) an approved deposit fund;
    (iii) a pooled superannuation trust; or
    (iv) a public sector superannuation scheme.
    within the meaning of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993
  • that is a body registered under the Financial Corporations Act 1974.
  • that is a trustee of:
    (i) a superannuation fund; or
    (ii) an approved deposit fund; or
    (iii) a pooled superannuation trust; or
    (iv) a public sector superannuation scheme
    within the meaning of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993 and the fund, trust or scheme has net assets of at least $10 million.
  • that is a listed entity or a related body corporate of a listed entity
  • that is an exempt public authority
  • that is a body corporate, or an unincorporated body, that:
    (i) carries on a business of investment in financial products, interests in land or other investments; and
    (ii) for those purposes, invests funds received (directly or indirectly) following an offer or invitation to the public, within the meaning of section 82 of the Corporations Act 2001, the terms of which provided for the funds subscribed to be invested for those purposes.
  • that is a foreign entity which, if established or incorporated in Australia, would be covered by one of the preceding paragraphs.
I Disagree