globalen

Passive investing

Passive investing is following a market-weighted index without deviating from it to achieve extra returns (alpha). Investors thus obtain the index returns adjusted for costs.

In the case of active investing, trackers – also referred to as ETFs – are often selected. Investors use a tracker to follow a stock or bond index.

A passive approach has advantages and disadvantages. Passive investors enjoy low management costs and low trading activity, but this is accompanied by a major disadvantage. Using the passive approach, investments are also made in those segments of the market that are characterized by an unattractive risk-return ratio. Take high-volatility equities, for instance. In an active approach, investors can avoid these segments and focus on the attractive parts of the market.

Quantitative investing
Quantitative investing

We’ve been leading the way in quant investing for over 25 years, turning research into practical solutions.

Read more
Quant solutions must look beyond the most conventional factors
Quant solutions must look beyond the most conventional factors
Quant strategies have come under pressure over the past two years.
24-11-2020 | Interview
Long read: Why I am more bullish than ever on quant
Long read: Why I am more bullish than ever on quant
Following more than two years of quant strategies generally underperforming sharply, investors are questioning whether quantitative investing is still viable.
11-11-2020 | Column
Factor investing – going beyond Fama and French
Factor investing – going beyond Fama and French
There is more to factor investing than the standard academic factors, says Head of Quant Research David Blitz.
02-11-2020 | 5-Year outlook