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Value investing

Human instincts drive the Value premium

Companies with exciting growth stories can lure investors, while those that receive little fanfare can deter them. The resulting optimism about glamour stocks and pessimism about their Value counterparts give rise to the Value premium. Learn more about how human instincts drive the Value factor.

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  • Factors are eternal

    New research reveals that equity factor styles, including Value, have existed and persisted since the mid-19th century.

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  • Factors are attractively priced

    Equity factors, especially Value, are currently very attractively priced and factor premiums persist across interest rate cycles.

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  • The five principles

    As value investing continue to make a comeback, Boston Partners’ Mark Donovan outlines its five principles that have stood the test of time.

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Related strategies

  • Asia-Pacific Equities

    • Focused investing in Asia-Pacific equities
    • Concentrated portfolio driven by bottom-up selection targeting approximately 90 positions
    • Risk allocation over performance drivers
  • QI Global Value Equities

    • Part of Robeco's range of factor-premium strategies, which includes Conservative Equities, Momentum Equities and Quality Equities
    • Buying stocks with a low price to their intrinsic value
    • Avoid value traps by incorporating momentum, low-risk and quality factors
  • BP Global Premium Equities

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Attaining Value exposure in a sustainable manner

Rupeng Chen, Quant Equities Client Portfolio Manager, touches on the attractive opportunity Value investing currently presents, while also highlighting how the Quant Value Equities Strategy offers deep and consistent Value exposure in a sustainable way via a lower carbon footprint. Watch the video below.

Value exposures in a sustainable way

Related insights

Read more insights about value investing

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Related insights

Read more insights about value investing

View all insights
The value comeback is driving emerging markets equities too
The value comeback is driving emerging markets equities too
After a decade of lackluster returns, the value stock showdown reached a climax in 2020.
06-07-2021 | Insight
Podcast: Value, back with a vengeance
Podcast: Value, back with a vengeance
Value stocks are in revival – this after what seemed like an endless run of underperformance relative to growth stocks.
01-07-2021 | Podcast
From deep value to ‘value with a future’
From deep value to ‘value with a future’
As the global economy continues to recover, our positive stance on global equity markets remains well underpinned.
28-04-2021 | Quarterly outlook
A new market climate? Opportunities from Joe Biden's first 100 days
A new market climate? Opportunities from Joe Biden's first 100 days
US President Joe Biden will mark his first 100 days in office on 30 April.
11-05-2021 | Webinar
Identifying value stocks with machine learning
Identifying value stocks with machine learning
Machine learning (ML) mispricing models are designed to detect hidden nonlinearities that are important in predicting the fundamental value of stocks.
26-09-2022 | Research
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