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A person or entity is a “wholesale client” if they satisfy the requirements of section 761G of the Corporations Act.
This commonly includes a person or entity:

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  • that is a body regulated by APRA other than a trustee of:
    (i) a superannuation fund;
    (ii) an approved deposit fund;
    (iii) a pooled superannuation trust; or
    (iv) a public sector superannuation scheme.
    within the meaning of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993
  • that is a body registered under the Financial Corporations Act 1974.
  • that is a trustee of:
    (i) a superannuation fund; or
    (ii) an approved deposit fund; or
    (iii) a pooled superannuation trust; or
    (iv) a public sector superannuation scheme
    within the meaning of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993 and the fund, trust or scheme has net assets of at least $10 million.
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  • that is a foreign entity which, if established or incorporated in Australia, would be covered by one of the preceding paragraphs.
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Understand how factor premiums impact performance
Pioneers in factor investing

Understand how factor premiums impact performance

Numerous academic studies suggest that harvesting well-rewarded factor premiums, like value, low volatility, quality or momentum enhances returns in the long run. The one that has received most attention in recent years is the low volatility factor.

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The low risk anomaly is one of the most fascinating paradoxes of all time as it defeats classic investment theories. Low risk stocks historically beat high risk ones going back well over eighty years over 18 times their returns.

  • 2006 we start pioneering
    Proven track record
  • > AUD 27 billion assets under management
    As per December 2016
  • 3 factors
    Enhanced approach to avoid pitfalls
Five concerns with low volatility index ETFs
Research

Five concerns with low volatility index ETFs

Equity investors have a choice between active low volatility managers and low volatility index ETFs. Index strategies offer a transparent and often cheaper alternative to active low volatility investing, but in our view this comes with several drawbacks.

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Understand how factor premiums impact performance
Pioneers in factor investing

Understand how factor premiums impact performance

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Emerging Conservative Equities

Capture the equity premium in emerging markets with potentially lower downside risk.

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Global DM Conservative Equities

Aiming to achieve global developed equity returns at an expected lower level of downside risk.

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