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Hitch your wagon to the stars of emerging markets
Emerging Markets

Hitch your wagon to the stars of emerging markets

Emerging markets have undergone radical changes since the term was first coined in the 1980s. They now show signs of stability and maturity. Combined with dynamic growth prospects, this has turned them into a must-have for investors. Our Sustainable Emerging Stars strategy looks for the most promising stocks both from a return and a sustainability perspective.

Download (Guide to Emerging Markets)

  • Green is the new color, also for emerging markets

    Rising demand for sustainable investment solutions stresses the need to measure ESG’s real impact on investment performance. Yet this is easier said than done.

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  • Guide to emerging markets investing

    We explain why emerging markets equities can be a valuable addition to global equity portfolios, and discuss several ways to gain exposure to this multi-faceted asset class.

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  • China: navigating the push towards technology leadership

    After more than three decades of accelerated catchup with more advanced economies, China is now engaged in a race for global technology leadership.

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Podcast: China – from power shortages to power play

  • In our latest podcast, we discuss China’s challenges – from property to power shortages. We also zoom in on China’s ambition as it moves from a trade war to a tech war with the US. "The rivalry will only intensify," says Jie Lu, Head of Investments China. Tune in for more fascinating insights.

    Tune in

Why invest in the Sustainable Emerging Stars Equities strategy?

Let us explain in 3 minutes

Further ‘gamification’, or back to fundamental investing?
Further ‘gamification’, or back to fundamental investing?
First Futu, then WeBull, and now Longbridge.
11-01-2022 | Column
China flexes its policy muscles – but can they still do the heavy lifting?
China flexes its policy muscles – but can they still do the heavy lifting?
China’s muscle flexing to fix its problems is set to keep investors cautious until the domestic economy garners more growth.
06-01-2022 | Monthly outlook
Podcast: Is this Peak Insanity?
Podcast: Is this Peak Insanity?
With current market valuations now exceeding those of 1929, and even of 1999, the term ‘peak insanity’ is coined.
24-12-2021 | Podcast

Guide to emerging markets investing

In this publication, we explain why emerging markets equities can be a valuable addition to global equity portfolios. book-spread-guide-to-emerging-markets.png

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