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Robeco publishes Active Ownership Report 2018

Robeco publishes Active Ownership Report 2018

15-03-2019 | Active Ownership Report
Using our position as an asset manager to effect meaningful change at companies is a vital part of our dedication to sustainability investing at Robeco. We’ve enjoyed some notable achievements in the past year, as our latest report covering 2018 shows.
  • Carola van Lamoen
    Carola
    van Lamoen
    Head of Active Ownership

Active ownership – primarily through engagement with investee companies and voting on the assets that we manage on behalf of clients – is an essential part of integrating sustainability into our investment process. We focus on environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors that are financially material. Engagement and voting are key components of this, since it results in ESG improvements at the companies in which we invest, leading to long term value creation.

We began the year with five new engagement themes. One of those new themes focuses on tackling climate change by targeting the world’s biggest carbon emitters. As part of these efforts, we enjoyed success in spearheading engagement where we collaborated with other Climate Action 100+ investors. We persuaded Shell to link cuts in its carbon footprint to executive pay. This was the first time in the oil & gas sector. This unprecedented decision received global attention and provides a workable framework for affecting change at other companies within the sector.

Alliances such as the one with Climate Action 100+ are becoming increasingly important. Last year, we joined many new groups, including the Investor Alliance for Human Rights in the US, the Brazilian engagement platform AMEC, and closer to home, the Dutch Living Wage Financials platform.

We were just as busy with proxy voting, casting our votes on behalf of clients at more than 5,000 shareholder meetings. And this is by no means ‘rubber-stamping’ – we voted against at least one agenda item in over half the meetings at which we voted. These and other statistics, case studies and success stories are featured in the 2018 Active Ownership report detailing all our activities last year.

Disclaimer

BY CLICKING ON “I AGREE”, I DECLARE I AM A WHOLESALE CLIENT AS DEFINED IN THE CORPORATIONS ACT 2001.

What is a Wholesale Client?
A person or entity is a “wholesale client” if they satisfy the requirements of section 761G of the Corporations Act.
This commonly includes a person or entity:

  • who holds an Australian Financial Services License
  • who has or controls at least $10 million (and may include funds held by an associate or under a trust that the person manages)
  • that is a body regulated by APRA other than a trustee of:
    (i) a superannuation fund;
    (ii) an approved deposit fund;
    (iii) a pooled superannuation trust; or
    (iv) a public sector superannuation scheme.
    within the meaning of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993
  • that is a body registered under the Financial Corporations Act 1974.
  • that is a trustee of:
    (i) a superannuation fund; or
    (ii) an approved deposit fund; or
    (iii) a pooled superannuation trust; or
    (iv) a public sector superannuation scheme
    within the meaning of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993 and the fund, trust or scheme has net assets of at least $10 million.
  • that is a listed entity or a related body corporate of a listed entity
  • that is an exempt public authority
  • that is a body corporate, or an unincorporated body, that:
    (i) carries on a business of investment in financial products, interests in land or other investments; and
    (ii) for those purposes, invests funds received (directly or indirectly) following an offer or invitation to the public, within the meaning of section 82 of the Corporations Act 2001, the terms of which provided for the funds subscribed to be invested for those purposes.
  • that is a foreign entity which, if established or incorporated in Australia, would be covered by one of the preceding paragraphs.
I Disagree